Mutant Genes

During reproduction when the chromosomes (and genes) are duplicated to produce an exact copy to be passed to the offspring an error occasionally occurs resulting in one of the genes being 'modified'. This 'modified' gene is known as a mutant gene or mutant allele and is then copied during progressive division. The chances of a mutant gene occurring are extremely rare, somewhere in the region of a million to one, and a mutant gene will occupy the same locus (location on the chromosome) that its normal sister would have located.

Just as any gene can mutate, so can a mutant gene also mutate, and so there may be a number of mutations that develop from one single gene over time. However, any such mutations will always occupy the same locus on the chromosome and so a locus may have many known mutant alleles.

During reproduction when the chromosomes (and genes) are duplicated to produce an exact copy to be passed to the offspring an error occasionally occurs resulting in one of the genes being 'modified'. This 'modified' gene is known as a mutant gene or mutant allele and is then copied during progressive division. The chances of a mutant gene occurring are extremely rare, somewhere in the region of a million to one, and a mutant gene will occupy the same locus (location on the chromosome) that its normal sister would have located.

Just as any gene can mutate, so can a mutant gene also mutate, and so there may be a number of mutations that develop from one single gene over time. However, any such mutations will always occupy the same locus on the chromosome and so a locus may have many known mutant alleles.